Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, North Dakota is in Pierce County, northwest of Rugby.  In the 2010 Census, it was listed as having 20 residents.

We chose to visit Barton after a vocal visitor to our Facebook page suggested it on more than one occasion.  It turned out to be a great suggestion — Barton has abandoned buildings on both sides of its main street.

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Update: We’re told the Barton Sportsman’s Club was torn down in Summer of 2013.

Barton, ND

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Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Both of these photos show the steps which once led to buildings which no longer stand in Barton.  We’d love to know what once used to be here if someone can enlighten us.

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

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Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

We’ve heard from one resident of Barton who seems to have a problem with the use of the word “abandoned” in describing some of the buildings in Barton, preferring to describe the structures as being “in disrepair” instead. In our opinion, it’s splitting hairs. Abandoned does not mean unowned. If a building is no longer used for the purpose it was originally intended, if its windows are boarded up, if it’s been vandalized and graffitti’d, if it has weeds and grass growing up around it, then it’s not a big stretch to call it abandoned, whether things are stored in it, and whether someone owns it or not.

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

Barton has a very impressive city park which hosts (or hosted) Haakenson family reunions every year for a time.

Barton, ND

Barton, ND

This structure looks like it might have been a school, converted to someone’s home, but we’re just guessing on that.

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC
Writers/Bloggers: Ghosts of North Dakota intellectual property and photo use guidelines can be found here.

Comments
20 Responses to “Barton, ND”
  1. Tanner Thompson says:

    Neat Schoolish looking building

  2. Robyn says:

    Aww…was hoping you’d put my parents house on there, but alas, its not abandoned. Alot of the buildings are used for duck hunters, although, not soo sure its healthy to stay in some of them. I am a member of the church there, its still in service, but in a co-op with Rugby, we still have services the 1st Sunday of the Month. I was confirmed there, and my son was baptized there. The old bar was pretty neat…the back addition has hundreds of signatures signed on the walls from people who had celebrated birthdays, reunions, or whatever there. I also remember a single gas pump being there, and the bar carried a few necessities for those that couldnt get to town, such as milk, cream, ect. The post office closed in the early 90′s and was made into a house addition. Too bad the building across from the bar is gone..that was a hot spot back in the day, it was a big hall and people had many dances there, and they also played basketball there.

    • Lynnette says:

      I grew up on a farm SW of Barton and then later my parents bought a house in town. These pictures bring back so many memoires. I remember going to First Grade at the school before it was closed. I remember the Christmas party at the hall across from the bar…both the school and the hall are now gone. I also remember (barely) when there were TWO Lutheran churches in town before they merged. I’m thinking that’s my grandparents house is one of the photos…..the tiny one which is almost falling down. I also remember the grocery store which was run by the Dearduffs. The post office was in the store as well until it was moved into their trailer once the store closed. They had a huge dog (or he seemed huge to a little girl) that used to used to sprawl out in one of the aisles……he wasn’t the friendliest dog and always scared me. As well there was a little café run by the Duff’s. I LOVED to be able to go in there and buy candy or a cold soda whenever we came to town.My uncle had the little garage with a gas pump. He had a small peanut machine in the garage and I would love to get a penny from my dad for a handful of peanuts.

      I was back to Barton a few years ago for the 4th of July celebration! I live in Canada so I wanted to show my hubby and son where I grew up. They were both impressed that such a small community could put on such a wonderful event. Thanks for the sharing the pictures of Barton and other communities and what is left of some of them…..I’ve been spending time going through the blogs the past couple of days……

      • Lynnette says:

        One more thing…..the playground equipment at the park in the photos? They used to be in front of the school and were moved to the park after the school was gone. That merry-go-round made me instantly go to the time I fell on it and chipped my two front teeth on those steel bars….LOL. My parents were not happy with me….LOL

  3. Bernice Schneibel says:

    I was born and grew up on a farm west of Barton and went to school in Barton and graduated from high school
    there.It is so sad to see the way it looks now. Thanks for sharing.
    Bernice Schneibel (Olsen )

  4. Robyn says:

    The merry go round, I don’t think is from the school..at first the park just had the swings, slide and sandbox. Then probably early 90′s they added the merry go round and the new set of swings over by the outhouses. I just can’t remember if I was living in Barton at the time they added them or not, my family moved there in 91 or 92. I grew up in the house to the west of where the school was, the house is still lived in. If you go in the lot where the school was the cement where the flagpole was is still there.

    • Lynnette says:

      Hi Robyn….you could be right about the merry-go-round. If it’s not the same one….it’s very similar. LOTS of those metal bars…..ha! .they may not be the safest by todays standards but it sure has stood the test of time. :) along with the slide and swings too…… If you lived in the house west of the school, is that the one with the pillars on the outside? If so…..that is the one we lived in for a few years when my parents moved into Barton. We bought it from the Monsons. Dick Monson was the railroad conductor when Barton had a train station I believe.

      • Robyn says:

        Sorry I haven’t been back on this page in awhile, yes thats the house! They always called it the Monson House, I heard he worked for the railroad, but thats about all I remember. We bought it from a man with the last name of Skar.

  5. Lois Nielsen-Johns says:

    My late father was Rev. Ejvind H. Nielsen. We lived in Willow City, ND and he served a 3-church parish which included a Lutheran Church in Barton. I remember Deardruffs grocery, and the big square house. It had porches then (both first and second floor). I think I was inside it, lots of nice woodwork, don’t remember anything about it having been a school.

  6. Cheryl Miller says:

    My mother, Margrethe Isaacson, grew up on a farm near here, so I had many visits as a child to this area visiting family. A favorite hangout in town was the Texaco gas station owned by my Uncle Arnie Isaacson. My Tolsby relatives have enjoyed a couple of reunions at the park and was so happy that there was a Barton Meteors Club that helped take care of that area for many years. If you knew Edwin, Lars, Arthur, Irene, or Eleanor, they were also part of my family. I also loved spending time with cousin Elaine Bye and her family….Muriel was definitely a favorite aunt! I have many pictures I’ve taken in Barton too in case there’s a way to add some of those.

  7. Marian Olson Kerr says:

    I am the youngest daughter of Gunder and Selma Olson. My brother and sister-in-law Art and Hazel Olson, my nieces Dianne Tuff and Denise Genre and my nephews Curt Olson and Laverne Olson. I went to grade school in Barton 1st through 6th grade. I have many good memories of Barton and the people there, Krefting Store, then the store and post office after Bert and Allen bought it.

  8. Janell Wilson says:

    I am from the Olsen and Fosness family. Both families grew up in the Barton area. The last picture of the red house belonged to Dagmar Bye it was green for many years but has been bought and repainted by others. That house came from a Sears Catalog. My Grandmother Marie Fosness lived right next door to her. I remember the store and cafe while visiting there. My parents’ farm is west of Barton and is still in the family.

    • Lois Nielsen-Johns says:

      I knew Marie Fosness! She was one of my Dad’s parishioners, and we visited her many times. She baked the best sandbakkels (not sure of spelling) in the world! The Sears catalog houses are interesting. I’ve looked at some of the old plans on the web.

  9. Scott Walsh says:

    I was a duck hunter and i loved the whole area. I still do.

  10. Scott Walsh says:

    because of the nice people and beautiful country!

  11. Diane Tackett says:

    My mothers sister, Evelyn Thomas, taught school in Barton in 1940. I have a copy of the yearbook for that year. My uncle Robert Thomas also attended school there.

  12. Susan says:

    My grandparents and also my dad used to own the bar in Barton. Spent lots of time there and have some good memories.

  13. Barb Godejohn says:

    My dad, Jenard Saude, grew up in Barton on a farm. He loved it there. He goes back every chance he gets. He is 80 years old now.

  14. Eric Stumpf says:

    I used to pass through Barton many times when I made the trip from Rugby to Willow City. I was the Missouri Synod Lutheran Pastor in those two places. I was invited in the winter of 1976 to give a presentation at the Lutheran Church in Barton during a family night. I remember it was full of people and we had a very enjoyable time. Very friendly people and welcoming.

  15. Robyn says:

    The bar just got torn down Summer 2013.

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