Blabon, North Dakota

Two Views of Blabon, 97 Years Apart

These two dramatically different views of Blabon, North Dakota vividly depict how quickly things changed for some small North Dakota railroad communities in the twentieth century.

Blabon, 1916

The postcard above was sent to Olaf Andersen in Detroit on October 4th, 1916 with a message written in a foreign language. The photo by C.A. Sund reveals an entire townscape which has virtually vanished from the prairie with the exception of the two homes on the left.

Order Book Two

Blabon, North Dakota

In 2013, the two homes above are the only two remaining structures shown in the postcard above.  The church, the grain elevator, and all the other structures (with perhaps the exception of the homes on the extreme left edge of the postcard) are gone today.

Photos by Terry Hinnenkamp except where noted.
Original content copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Comments
8 Responses to “Two Views of Blabon, 97 Years Apart”
  1. James Twaddle says:

    I would like to see the back of the postcard from 1916.

  2. Cali G says:

    There is no one living here?

  3. Nancy L. Free says:

    My Mother, Esther Olivia (Norberg) LaFrance was born in Blabon, North Dakota on April 24, 1926. I visited the town with her and her Mother (my Grandmother) — Olga (Amendson) Norberg sometime in the late 1950′s. The bed my Mother was born in, was still in the run down abandon house they had lived in. These wonderful photos mean more to me than words can say. Thank you

  4. Mary Lorenz says:

    Do you have any plans to include Blabon in a future book? My dad and his twin brother were born in Blabon in 1932. Thanks. Love your website.

  5. angela snyder says:

    My family and I took a road trip from Vancouver WA to Wadena MN and we visited “Blabon” in August 2013. It was difficult to locate. Thank goodness for GPS. I was very interested in researching my family history last year. My great grandfather John Becker ran a store there and one of his son’s named Harold Becker was born there in the early 1900′s. John and his wife Ada only lived there for a few years before moving to Bena MN.
    While we were there we saw the old run down houses that are shown on your website. Also we visited a small cemetery seemingly in the middle of nowhere, among the miles of farmland. We walked through the cemetery and did not see any “Becker’s” there. I would be very curious to see old pictures of the town when it was prosperous…

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