Before the Flood: Leaving Sanish, North Dakota

By / June 26, 2014 / Sanish, ND

We’ve posted several galleries dedicated to Sanish, North Dakota, the former Missouri River town that was dismantled timber and brick and dispersed to higher ground when the Garrison Dam was erected, flooding this part of the Missouri River Valley.  There’s a gallery dedicated to the construction of Four Bears Bridge, our visit to the crumbling remains during historic low water levels in 2005, a Christmas in Sanish gallery, and a look down the street in front of the school and church, but no two photos we’ve seen so far capture this time in our history as these two photos submitted by Don Hammer.

The first photo was taken in October, 1952.

Sanish, North Dakota

Make note of the landmarks.  The school in the background, upper left, and the little black building between (and partially obscured by) the elevators in the lower left. Next, take a look at the photo below, taken from almost the same spot on the bluff in December, 1953.  The abandonment of Sanish is nearly complete.

Sanish, North Dakota

The school is still there in the background, and the camera angle is shifted slightly to the left, so you can see the white church to the left of the school (it was just slightly out of frame in the upper photo), but both of the elevators near the black building in the center are gone, as is most of Sanish.

Photos submitted by Don Hammer, one-time resident of Sanish.

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About Author

Troy Larson

Troy Larson is a father, husband, author, photographer, publisher and devoted cat person. Troy is the President of Sonic Tremor Media and co-founder of GhostsofNorthDakota.com

13 Comments

Leonard Tomsik

In the late 60’s and early 70’s the Army Corps of Engineers rerouted the Hocking River ( a trib. of the Ohio River)
around the campus of Ohio University in Athens. Each year it seemed it would flood and they got tired of having
to redo the buckled gym floor. Great accomplishment and has been successful ever since.

Reply
Lynn Mickelson

Is almost unbelievable to see the changes in only a years’ time! Fantastic addition of photos to an already awesome web site. A big “Thank You” to Don Hammer for sharing these two photos.

Lynn Mickelson

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Clif Nelson

very neat,I have some old pics of Garrison Dam while it is being built taken by my Uncle who was with the Army Corps of Engineers back then…any interest?

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Scott Myhre

Hi Troy,

Great Pictures of the original Four Bears bridge construction! My Grandfather (Joseph Myhre) worked on that project and was credited with saving another construction workers life. As a kid, I remember a newspaper article in the New Town paper that said he dove into the Missouri river to rescue a worker that had fallen from the bridge. I am not sure of the details but I wanted to let you know that I really enjoy your pictures and stories of North Dakota before the oil boom and changes.

Thanks Troy for all of your hard work!

Scott…..

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Lynn Mickelson

A ‘ditto’ to Scott’s last comment! Thanks, Troy for all your work on this wonderful website!!!

Lynn Mickelson

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Tim Johnson

Very interesting. And great photos. FYI: I’m originally from south of Turtle Lake (McLean county east and south of Old Sanish). Sanish wasn’t the only town in that area to be moved. In fact Turtle Lake was created from a “whole clothe” so to speak when the Great Northern Railroad cut off their tracks to Wanamaker (which was a few miles east of modern Turtle Lake). Apparently a prominent Wanamaker Citizen got into a hissing match with officials of GNR. That was in 1905.
See http://www.tj49.com/from-wanamaker-to-turtle-lake (thanks to Vernon Keel, author of “The Murdered Family”)

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Scott Davy

My Grandfather ran the drugstore in Sanish right up until the end. I think I have a box of photographs from that era, would anyone like to see them if I can find them and scan them?

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Don Hammer

Scott:

Was your grandfather’s name Bugge?

I’d very much like to see any photos of old Sanish.

Don Hammer

Reply

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