North American Bison of Theodore Roosevelt National Park

North American Bison of Theodore Roosevelt National Park

During their historic journey to the Pacific, Lewis and Clark reported enormous herds of North American Bison in the midwest, so large that they “darkened the whole plains.”  Wagon trains sometimes waited days for passage through herds numbering in the hundreds of thousands, if not millions.  But by the early 1900’s the bison were reaching their low-point.  Over-hunting, drought, and encroachment on their natural habitat by humans and cattle drove the population of bison down to only several hundred animals…

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Sims, North Dakota

Sims, North Dakota

Sims, North Dakota is a ghost town in Morton County, about 35 miles west of Mandan, just a few miles south of Interstate 94 — a place so hauntingly beautiful, we chose the photo above for the dustjacket cover of our second book.  Sims is a place people have been telling us to visit for nearly ten years, but it took us this long to find a way to work it into the schedule. Several structures remain standing in Sims —…

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Driving Through a Herd of North American Bison in Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Driving Through a Herd of North American Bison in Theodore Roosevelt National Park

On our recent visit to North Dakota’s southwest corner, we spent some time in Theodore Roosevelt National Park in Medora, and we were reminded of the magic of the Badlands. For anyone who lives in eastern North Dakota in the flat lands which were once the bottom of glacial Lake Agassiz, it’s easy to forget that North Dakota is not entirely flat. As Terry and I entered the Badlands and caught our first look at Painted Canyon from the highway,…

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Hartland, ND

Hartland, ND

Hartland is a tiny rural settlement in Ward County, about 25 miles northwest of Minot.  Unfortunately, much of what remains of Hartland is now fenced and posted “no trespassing,” so we were unable to get closer to the two abandoned homes shown here.  We saw one inhabited home on the site of Hartland. The nearby (and often-suggested by our visitors) town of Aurelia is equally as sparse.  We did not visit Aurelia for a lack of structures to photograph. Photos…

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Coulee, ND

Coulee, ND

Coulee is a tiny unincorporated town in the far northeast corner of Mountrail county, about 40 miles northwest of Minot.  Our Savior’s Scandinavian Lutheran Church, a few miles west of Coulee, is on the National Register of Historic Places.  Unfortunately, we didn’t find out about it until after our visit.  We’ll get it next time. This home was once the parsonage of the Coulee Lutheran Parish. Sad remains of a former church. Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright…

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Exploring Fortuna Air Force Station

Exploring Fortuna Air Force Station

This is just a bit of our exploration and shoot at the abandoned Fortuna Air Force Station which is scheduled for demolition in late-summer/fall of 2013.  According to the caretaker, after asbestos remediation, all the structures above ground will be demolished and scrapped, with the exception of the concrete radar tower which will be left in place. Click Here to check out our photo galleries of Fortuna AFS. Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Bethel Lutheran Church, Rural Wildrose

Bethel Lutheran Church, Rural Wildrose

On fourth of July weekend, 2013, we found ourselves ahead of schedule on our two day photo shoot.  In the town of Fortuna, we found the church we wanted to photograph had oil workers camping out on the property and big trucks parked in front of it.  We moved on to another location which also turned out to be a bust, so we set out for Powers Lake to get some lunch. As we drove along highway 50 between Alamo…

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A Last Look at the Abandoned Fortuna Air Force Station: part II

A Last Look at the Abandoned Fortuna Air Force Station: part II

This is our second gallery for the abandoned Fortuna Air Force Station.  It was demolished in the summer of 2015.  Click here to start at part one. Stairway to nowhere. Terry ventured into the bowels of a structure at the top of the hill and came across this vivid reminder that the men and women who worked here were putting their lives on the line every day and facing a grim future if relations with the Soviets went the wrong…

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