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The Haunting and Deserted Tyner Cemetery

The Haunting and Deserted Tyner Cemetery

Tyner’s derelict pioneer cemetery is all that remains of a rural settlement in Pembina County once known as Tyner.  Cemeteries are not something we usually feature as an entity all their own, primarily because there are plenty of websites out there which focus on cemeteries and family history already.  However, Terry visited Tyner Cemetery in August of 2012 to photograph the headstones for some of his wife’s family — the McCurdy’s — and was moved by the solitude of the site.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Short Creek Church & Cemetery

Short Creek Church & Cemetery

Short Creek Church is in northern Burke County, a short drive southwest of Portal, North Dakota, and just over three miles from the US/Canada border. If I’m not mistaken, it was a Lutheran Church for its entire active life, and served a congregation of many Scandinavian immigrants, and settlers of German ancestry as well.

Short Creek Lutheran Church

I’m not sure when they stopped holding regular services in Short Creek Church. If you know, please leave a comment below.

Short Creek Lutheran Church

Short Creek Lutheran Church

The Short Creek Church sign shown above was donated by Susan Kay Swenson.

Short Creek Lutheran Church

In a time when most historic places like this are locked up tight to deter vandals, it was something of a surprise to find this church open for visitors. Let’s hope Short Creek Church can continue to be free from troublemakers so future generations can enjoy it, inside and out.

Short Creek Lutheran Church

I went up the stairway toward the bell tower, but the belfry was not easily accessible, so I settled for a photo looking down from the stairs, below.

Short Creek Lutheran Church

Short Creek Lutheran Church

The plaque on the wall left me a little curious for more details on this church. It says the church was organized in 1904 and completed in 1916, but the sign outside says the church was established in 1908. Who can clarify the details? Please leave a comment.

It was also interesting that another Swenson, Reuben, organized a restoration and re-dedication of this church in 1981. 35 years later, Short Creek Church is in need of another freshening. It’s a reminder of how quickly things can deteriorate without human intervention.

Short Creek Lutheran Church

In the sanctuary, a tattered American flag hung behind the altar, with several of the stars missing. It wasn’t clear to me how they were removed or why they were missing, but at risk of sounding dramatic, it reminded me of postapocalypse movies in which a worn American flag is meant to insinuate midnight in America.

I sat quietly in one of the pews for a moment and soaked in the ambience before taking the photo above.

Short Creek Lutheran Church

Short Creek Lutheran Church

The small cemetery behind the church has a surprising number of internments. See the full list on the Rootsweb page for Short Creek Cemetery.

Short Creek Lutheran Church

Photos by Troy Larson, copyright © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Elbowoods Memorial Congregational Church

Elbowoods Memorial Congregational Church

Officially, this church is now known as Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church. It once served Elbowoods, North Dakota, a town now-submerged under Lake Sakakawea, as part of the Fort Berthold Indian Mission which dates back to the 1870s.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

The church was organized in 1899 and this building was erected in Elbowoods in 1926.  It was relocated in 1953 to a spot on high ground, nearly eight miles north-northeast of Elbowoods, to escape the rising waters of Lake Sakakawea behind the newly constructed Garrison Dam.  It is just off ND 1804, about fourteen miles west of Roseglen, and it is one of a number of structures which were relocated from Elbowoods.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

The state historical society has a photo of five young girls standing on the steps of this church in the twenties to forties era here.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

This church was featured in our book, Churches of the High Plains.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

Charles Hall, an Englishman with a thirst for spreading the gospel, set out for so-called Indian country in 1874. He married his first wife, Emma Calhoun, who died a few years later, then remarried Susan Webb, the namesake of this church. The late Reverend Harold Case wrote a book called “100 years at Fort Berthold” in 1977 which tells the story of Elbowoods. Charles Hall died in 1940.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

Looking out on the cemetery from the bell tower.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

It’s an understandably sensitive subject when you’re talking about people’s remains, but the appearance of this cemetery suggests some of the deceased who died prior to 1953 were originally interred elsewhere, then relocated to this place, presumably to escape the coming flood. I haven’t spent enough time at the library to know the full-story, so please leave a comment below if you know more.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

This monument dedicated to the Hall family stands in the center of the cemetery.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

It reads: Emma Calhoun Hall. Born 1850 — Died 1881. She was the first to give her life as a missionary for Christ among the Mandan, Gros Ventre and Arichara Indians.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

We visited this place to pay our respects to those who came before us, and to shine a spotlight on a place that had a prominent part in the settlement of our state, but is forgotten or altogether unknown by most. Unfortunately, our visit was seen by a few as an unwelcome intrusion by outsiders, and we’re told a fence has been erected around this church in the time since, and visitors are not welcome.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

The marker simply reads “Bell Porcupine”

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

This marker was so weathered, I could only make out the word “died,” and the “Porcupine” name on the headstone.

Susan Webb Hall Memorial Congregational Church

This marker reads: Austin White Duck. Born Mar. 1st, 1903. Died December 24th, 1909.

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Sunday Morning on the Prairie at Norway Lutheran Church

Sunday Morning on the Prairie at Norway Lutheran Church

Norway Lutheran Church is in Nelson County, forty-three miles southeast of Devils Lake, not far from the valley where the Sheyenne River carves its way through the North Dakota landscape. Terry and I were on an adventure to photograph old steel automobile bridges, but as always, we were scanning the countryside for other abandoned things and roadside curiosities to shoot. As we traveled down a gravel road, Terry spotted a weathered steeple sticking up above the treeline, and we made a short detour to this place.

Norway Lutheran Church

Norway Lutheran Church looks as though it has not been used in quite some time, but someone has taken the care to secure it from the elements by covering the former windows, and even took the time to paint them with faux-window frames for aesthetic purposes. Quite nice. The green shingles are peeling in places, though, and this church will need some TLC in the foreseeable future.

Norway Lutheran Church

It reached almost 60 degrees on this day in the second week of November. We couldn’t resist the urge to take advantage of the good weather.

Norway Lutheran Church

Norway Lutheran Church

Norway Lutheran Church

The cemetery is still well-cared for and regularly used. We saw some internments that were as recent as 2014. Quanbeck, a name that survives today with local landowners, was one of the more prominent family names in the cemetery. The cemetery is also listed at Find A Grave.

Norway Lutheran Church

If you enjoy prairie churches like these, please check out our hardcover coffee table book, Churches of the High Plains. It makes a perfect gift, and every order helps us offset the cost of documenting these vanishing places.

Norway Lutheran Church

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, © 2015 Sonic Tremor Media

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
The Majestic and Abandoned North Grand Church

The Majestic and Abandoned North Grand Church

The majestic and abandoned North Grand Church is in Adams County, ten miles southwest of Hettinger and just a mile north of the South Dakota border. It served this barely-populated part of the county for sixty years, from 1909 to 1969.

North Grand Church and Cemetery

I would describe this church as brick, although I’m not sure that’s the correct term. The blocks are larger than your typical brick and they have a textured surface that makes them particularly beautiful. If someone has some clarification on the construction of this church, please leave a comment below.

North Grand Church and Cemetery

We found getting to this church somewhat challenging. The nearest paved highway is five miles to the west, and even the dirt roads leading to this beautiful place are very lightly traveled. In places, it was just two wheel tracks with prairie grass growing up in the middle, but it was worth the trip. When we arrived, we shut off the car and got out, greeted with our favorite reward — the sound and smell of the prairie. Crickets chirped and the prairie grass swished in the light breeze. No traffic noise, no people, and our cellphones didn’t ring. Perfection.

North Grand Church and Cemetery

A visitor to our Facebook page reports this church was once part of a Lutheran Parish that included the Wolf Butte, Bucyrus, and Richland churches.

North Grand Church and Cemetery

North Grand Lutheran Church is surrounded on all sides by crop land with barely a tree in site.

North Grand Church and Cemetery

The inside of the North Grand Lutheran Church is in better condition than some of the churches we’ve visited, like St. John’s in Arena, but not by much. There aren’t many years left in this place without human intervention, and the remote location makes that unlikely.

North Grand Church and Cemetery

North Grand Church and Cemetery

North Grand Church and Cemetery

North Grand Church and Cemetery

Judging by the small number of graves, the cemetery has apparently been very lightly used. We saw mostly old stones from the WWII-era, but one was from as recently as 2006. Holden, Jeffers, and Hanson were some of the names we noticed.

North Grand Church and Cemetery

North Grand Church and Cemetery

If you enjoy country churches, both active and abandoned, please consider ordering a copy of our hardcover coffee table book, Churches of the High Plains, to help us offset our considerable web hosting and bandwidth costs.

North Grand Church and Cemetery

North Grand Church and Cemetery

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church

As we ventured toward Minot for a book signing event, we decided we would try to sneak in some shooting time at a few different locations along the drive, but this was not a place we knew about beforehand — we just happened to drive right by it, on highway 30 in Albert Township, just north of Maddock, North Dakota and couldn’t pass up such a picturesque church.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

This is the former Immanuel Lutheran Church. Founded in 1887 and closed “in God’s Service, July 1st, 2001.”

Immanuel Lutheran Church

The church was locked up tight so we couldn’t go inside, but a visitor to our Facebook page says a lot was removed from inside after this church closed.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

This was a very windy and cold November day. Two days later, the first significant snowfall of the season hit a large portion of the state.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church

This church is featured in our hardcover coffee table book, Churches of the High Plains, which, by the way, makes an excellent gift. 🙂

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Someone definitely took great care to design a great roadside monument for passing travelers to enjoy, including a photo of the church in brighter days, and the bell.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

This is the second church to wear the name Immanuel Lutheran Church. See the comment section below for the tragic story about the first Immanuel Lutheran Church and a lightning strike that claimed the church and the lives of several men.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church

There are some pretty old headstones in the cemetery — pioneers who rest in peace at this quiet spot on the prairie.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Neuburg Congregational Church

Neuburg Congregational Church

This is Neuberg Congregational Church, in Hettinger County, rural Mott.  The church, which is quite remote, nearly 25 miles from the nearest town, was built in 1925 and it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.

Neuburg Congregational Church

We visited Neuberg Congregational Church in July of 2014. The sky was thick with haze from forest fires (in Washington, Oregon, or Canada, depending on who you ask) which lent some weirdness to the look of the sky. The light changed by the minute.

Neuburg Congregational Church

Neuberg Congregational Church was founded in 1898 by a group of settlers, Germans from Russia, who had come to America seeking relief from increasingly oppressive living conditions. For seven years, they worshipped at the farm of John Sayler, but in 1905, they bought a vacant Lutheran church and moved it to this site. Twenty years later, their congregation having swelled in number, they chose to build this church. According to the National Register of Historic Places registration form, the settlers that built this church “totally ignored the Russian part of their heritage. They culturally identified as Germans.” Until 1953, all services were held in German.

Neuburg Congregational Church

This church was featured in our hardcover coffee table book, Churches of the High Plains — a great gift for the North Dakota-lover on your list.

Neuburg Congregational Church

Must have been a big congregation. That’s a lot of biffies.

Neuburg Congregational Church

Neuburg Congregational Church

Sometime after we visited in 2014, area residents decided it was time to bring Neuburg Congregational Church back from the brink. Our friend Tim Riley got some photos in 2016.

Neuburg Congregational Church

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
The Last of DeSart, North Dakota

The Last of DeSart, North Dakota

In 2004, a visitor to our website suggested a list of places we should investigate in the southwest corner of the state, a list I recall mostly from memory — DeSart, Pierce, Shollsmade, Hume, Ranger, Mound, Bessie. Back then, we had very little luck finding much on many of these places. Most of them were rural post offices where no development occurred, and another site visitor told us that nothing remained of DeSart, so we didn’t give it much more thought.

DeSart, North Dakota

Recently, Nate Reynolds posted these photos to our Facebook page and graciously gave us permission to post them here. About fifteen minutes northeast of Bowman, just off a remote and quiet country road, the last of DeSart, North Dakota — a shell of  home, and the DeSart cemetery.

DeSart, North Dakota

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DeSart, North Dakota

DeSart reportedly had 75 residents at its peak in 1920. Some of them no doubt rest in the DeSart Lutheran Cemetery shown below. By the 1970s, only 6 residents remained.

DeSart, North Dakota

Photos by Nate Reynolds
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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Sherbrooke Cemetery

Sherbrooke Cemetery

We shot these photos of Sherbrooke Cemetery during a visit to the nearby ghost town and namesake, Sherbrooke, North Dakota, in Steele County in October of 2013.

Sherbrooke, North DakotaThe Oxton family name was common in this cemetery.

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

This cemetery was established in 1899 by Sherbrooke Methodist Church which has long since vanished from the town site.

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

The Hildebrandt family.

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

Look at those birth dates. These are some of the oldest headstones we’ve seen for such a nice, easily-accessible cemetery. Many times you don’t see the really old ones unless you visit a derelict cemetery.

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

This child’s gravesite had a simple metal nameplate that had only the letters DRAEN on it.

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

The Verwest family plot.

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

Sherbrooke, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Blabon: Ten Years Later

Blabon: Ten Years Later

In October of 2003, we visited Blabon, North Dakota, a tiny near-ghost town in Steele County with a handful of residents, and it was the first stop on what would become a ten-year exploration of North Dakota’s ghost towns and abandoned places.  In 2013, we returned to Blabon after ten years to snap some photos and reflect on one of the stories sent to us by a very early fan of our website.

Blabon, North Dakota

Where there was once a small town with two grain elevators, a hotel, bank, bar, post office, and 900 residents, there are now only a handful of structures, a resident or three, and this lonely old collapsing home. Not even the train tracks remain. We’re not positive, but the home shown above appears to be the oldest, and perhaps the only remaining original structure in Blabon.  The roof has deteriorated considerably over the last decade.

Blabon, North Dakota

We actually have been to Blabon twice before, the last time in 2004.  Since then, the home shown above has been offered for sale on Craigslist several times.  We’re not sure if it ever sold — it is in really poor condition.

Blabon, North Dakota

Storm clouds on the horizon, as seen from the Blabon Cemetery. We noticed a fifth-wheel camper parked nearby which appeared to be lived-in and there appeared to be a little more life in Blabon than when we last visited.  We didn’t see anybody out and about, but it looks like Blabon might have gained a few residents.

Blabon, North Dakota

Ghosts of North Dakota and Churches of the High Plains hardcover coffee table books make a unique Christmas gift. Blabon is featured in Ghosts of North Dakota, Volume 3.

Blabon, North Dakota

Shortly after we founded the Ghosts of North Dakota website in early-2004, we received email from a gentleman in Norway named Øyvind Sætrevik whose great grandparents came to America around 1900 for a shot at the American dream.  In a series of emails (which have unfortunately been lost) he told us the story of his great grandparents losing a young child to illness, and eventually they gave up on their American endeavor and returned to Norway, leaving behind their child’s grave in Blabon as the only indication they ever came to America.

Blabon, North Dakota

We searched the headstones in the cemetery for an obvious match to the circumstances, but nothing seemed obvious. If Mr. Sætrevik is reading this, please contact us.

Blabon, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Kongsberg, ND

Kongsberg, ND

Kongsberg, North Dakota is a tiny near-ghost town in McHenry County, just a few miles east of another near-ghost town, Ruso.  Originally dubbed Olivia, the name changed to Kongsberg in 1916.  The population of Kongsberg never exceeded 50.  Kongsberg’s church celebrated their 100th anniversary on July 1st, 2012.

This was actually the second town in North Dakota named Kongsberg.  The first Kongsberg was near Abercrombie, but their Post Office closed in 1905.

If you know anything about Kongsberg’s present status… number of full-time residents, the nature of the buildings shown etc… please comment below. Thanks to R. David Adams for contributing these photos.

The former Kongsberg State Bank

The former Kongsberg State Bank

Kongsberg, ND

Kongsberg, ND

Kongsberg, ND

Kongsberg, ND

Kongsberg, ND

St. John Lutheran Church

St. John Lutheran Church

St. John Lutheran Cemetery

St. John Lutheran Cemetery

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Alfred, ND

Alfred, ND

Alfred is a near-ghost town in Lamoure county, southwest of Jamestown.  Alfred is unincorporated, hence official population figures are hard to come by, but there appear to be perhaps ten permanent residents in the actual town site with more in the surrounding rural area.  Alfred’s reported peak population was 150 in 1930.

Alfred has a well-maintained cemetery and a Seventh Day Adventist Church which was in session the day of our visit.  There were approximately ten vehicles parked outside, so there is plenty of activity for such a small town.  As we’ve seen in other towns like Alfred, the church will quite likely survive long after the residents are gone.

The northeast portion of Alfred is largely abandoned structures, near the lake and the former rail line (now gone).  The rest of the town is quite nice.  Alfred was founded by Englishman Richard Sykes, who founded five towns in North Dakota — Sykeston, Bowdon, Edgeley, Chaseley, and Alfred.

Ghosts of North Dakota, Volume 3

There are actually three structures in this photograph. On the right is a garage, in the center is some kind of small, one-room structure, and hidden in the trees on the left is a full-size home. Interior shots are below.

This is the interior of the one-room structure shown above.

This is the entryway of the home hidden in the trees.

What would have been the living room at one time…

This is the former kitchen and dining room. There was a small hole in the floor, and the you could see through to the basement. The integrity of the floor is a little suspect.

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Vanished: Pelto, North Dakota

Vanished: Pelto, North Dakota

Pelto, North Dakota is a town that no longer exists, except in the memory of those who grew up here. Located in Nelson County, between Grand Forks and Devils Lake, Pelto is an example of a settlement that has vanished with the railroad transportation culture that birthed it.

Pelto, North Dakota
Former site of Pelto. Image/Google Earth

In the era of the steam locomotive, there was a town every eight miles along the track, where engines could stop and refill their water tanks. Today, the tracks still pass just north of the site of Pelto, and there’s a nearby farm that looks abandoned, but nearly everything else has vanished.

Nathan Mastrud contributed these photos of Pelto with the following comments:

Pelto is about 42 miles east of Devils lake.  The only thing that really remains of the town is a Pelto tombstone. The fields that surround Pelto are slowing filling with water, abandoned farmsites & pelicans. The road to Pelto is Closed and has water up to the shoulder for most of the trip.

Pelto, North Dakota

The information on the memorial reads:

Pelto Merc Store-Closed 1957

Enterprise Consolidated School-Consolidated 1915-Closed 1969

Pelto Hall

Finnish Lutheran Church Established 1899

Pelto, North Dakota

A single metal milk container remains standing.

Pelto, North Dakota

There are only a few skeletons of the foundations buried in deep prairie grass with a couple automobile parts dumped in the swamp.

Pelto, North Dakota

Photos by Nathan Mastrud and Punchgut Studio

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Heaton – Six Years Later

Heaton – Six Years Later

Wells County
Inhabited as of 5/10

We returned to Heaton nearly six years after our first trip in 2004. How things have changed.

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Heaton, North Dakota

This is an animation showing the former Heaton Bank and the Hawks of Heaton Gift Shop (which we believe may have been the Post Office at one time as well).  As you can see, sometime between 2004 and 2010, the structures have disappeared.  we don’t know what happened to them.  Several homes which used to stand in Heaton are gone now as well.

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

The awning over the porch on the home above has collapsed sometime since 2004.  Click Here to see what it looked like then.

Heaton, North Dakota

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Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

Heaton, North Dakota

All photos by Troy and Rat, copyright SonicTremorMedia.com

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Silva, North Dakota

Silva, North Dakota

Pierce County
Inhabited as of 4/06

Silva was founded in 1912 as a Soo Line Railroad settlement. It reportedly reached a peak population of 125 in 1920 and has been on the decline ever since.

Silva’s most famous former resident would be Julius Thompson who at one time was the world’s tallest man at eight feet, seven inches. Thompson died in 1955.

In the late nineties, North Dakota State University did a study on statewide population decline and featured photos of Silva on the cover of the finished report. Unfortunately, the buildings no longer stand as they were burned due to infestation.

Present-day Silva appears to be home to a dozen or so residents, and perhaps 4 to 6 abandoned structures. The church, sans bell tower, stands alone on the east edge of town, with most of the remaining structures on the other side of the road leading into town.

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Silva, North Dakota

Silva, North Dakota

Silva, North Dakota

Silva, North Dakota

The vault is the only remnant of the bank today.

Silva, North Dakota

Silva, North Dakota

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Silva, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

See also: More from Silva, North Dakota

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
An Abandoned Farm near Lucca, North Dakota

An Abandoned Farm near Lucca, North Dakota

Lucca, North Dakota was founded in 1891 as a Soo Line railroad town, about a mile south of the present town site, and just north of a ghost town known as Binghamton, of which nothing remains today. Lucca was moved north, to be near the Soo Line/Northern Pacific Railroad junction, in the southeast corner of Barnes County, in 1900.

Old Lucca, ND

We visited in 2005 and found present-day Lucca looks a lot like a salvage yard these days, with only one or two abandoned buildings, and they were in the middle of some very elaborately posted private property. It was pretty hard to get any good pictures, so we chose to photograph this abandoned farm just north of town.

Old Lucca, ND

Whomever occupied this farm left a very long time ago.

Old Lucca, ND

Old Lucca, ND

Old Lucca, ND

Old Lucca, ND

There were crumbling outbuildings and fieldstone walls in various states of decay on this old farmstead.

Old Lucca, ND

Old Lucca, ND

Old Lucca, ND

Old Lucca, ND

Old Lucca, ND

These photos of the cemetery are from the present-day Lucca townsite.

Old Lucca, ND

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy
Blabon, ND

Blabon, ND

Steele County
Inhabited as of 10/04

Blabon, ND is in Steele County, not far from another ghost town on this site, Sherbrooke, ND. Blabon is the first ghost town we ever investigated. It is presently inhabited by approximately 8 to 12 people. As many as three houses were clearly occupied and one trailer home had a satellite dish on the side.

Blabon was founded in 1896, named for Joseph Ward Blabon, a Great Northern Railroad official who visited the townsite in 1897.

We received an email from Norway that reads as follows:

Sending you some pictures of Blabon as it was about 1900. My great grandparents did own/run a grocery store/pool saloon. The moved back to Norway about 1915 i think. Nice site you’ve got here 🙂

Greetings from Norway!
Øyvind Sætrevik

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy