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Inside Sheyenne River Academy

Inside Sheyenne River Academy

We visited the former Sheyenne River Academy, in Wells County just a few miles northeast of Harvey, in 2012. We were unable to find anybody at home when we visited, so we were unable to get permission to go inside.

However, John Mosher recently posted some photos of the abandoned remains of Sheyenne River Academy to our Facebook page and graciously gave us permission to post them here.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Second Chances in Oberon

Second Chances in Oberon

Oberon, North Dakota is in Benson County, about ten miles southwest of Fort Totten. Two places we had been to previously, Josephine and Flora, North Dakota, are a short drive west.

Oberon, North Dakota

We happened to drive through Oberon when we were on our way to Minot in 2014 and we were surprised to see there were some good photo opportunities that we hadn’t known about. Unfortunately, we didn’t have the time that day. So, our visit in the spring of 2015 was a second chance.

Oberon, North Dakota

In the 2010 Census, Oberon’s population was listed as 105; a pretty populated place compared to many of the small towns featured on this site. There was a photogenic combination of vacant places and creative reuse going on in Oberon, however, and we wanted to share a few places.

The Community Center on the corner of A Street and Main Avenue had neatly maintained grounds. Maybe it was a bank at one time? Perhaps someone can comment.

Oberon, North Dakota

Oberon, North Dakota

This town was first known as Antelope; a moniker authors Vernell and Louise Johnson say came from the settlement’s location at “the northwest end of the famous Antelope Valley, where antelope were plentiful.” The town was renamed Barker when the post office was established in 1885, but in 1886 Postmaster Vernon Matthews changed the name to Oberon, a reference to Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” and the town was platted.

Oberon, North Dakota

Oberon, North DakotaThe Oberon School looked like it was still a fully-active, functional school, and we had no reason to photograph it, really, other than the fact that it’s a big, beautiful brick building, and that temptation is hard to resist.

Oberon, North Dakota

If the alternative is letting an old church wither in the elements until it caves in, we’re thrilled to see beautiful old sanctuaries like the one in Oberon get some creative reuse. We saw another church in 2014 in Wabek, North Dakota that someone had turned into a home, and someone appeared to be moving into an old Post Office in Sentinel Butte. It’s so cool to see old places, steeped in history and heritage, getting second chances.

Oberon, North Dakota

Do you have our hardcover, Ghosts of North Dakota coffee table books? Order them in our store.

Oberon, North Dakota

Another place we couldn’t resist shooting. Calvary Lutheran Church.

Oberon, North Dakota

Services are Sunday at 9:30.

Oberon, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

The Last Days of Brantford

The Last Days of Brantford

We first became aware of Brantford some years ago when our friend Mark Johnson sent photos of Brantford in winter. In the summer of 2013, we visited Brantford for ourselves and found a very quiet, near-ghost town with an impressive but crumbling public school, among other things.  These photos were taken in 2015 after we found ourselves looking for something to photograph when another location we had planned to visit didn’t work out.

Brantford, North Dakota

As we drove into Brantford this time, we were surprised to see one of the classrooms had collapsed sometime between 2013 and 2015 after the exterior wall crumbled. It was a tangible reminder that exploring abandoned places is dangerous.

Brantford, North Dakota

I bet this was loud when it came down.

Brantford, North Dakota

Last time, we explored the inside of the school a little, but this time, we decided to take a closer look before we entered. After a brief walk around the school, it seemed clear to us that it is no longer safe to explore. The exterior walls are bowing on all sides and it is only a matter of time before the whole thing comes down. We would not recommend anyone explore the interior of this school anymore.

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Goodbye, Brantford Public School.

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Sometime in the two years since we last visited, there was a grassfire in Brantford. One of the houses which stood in 2013 was reduced to burned ruins, and the large red barn we photographed last time was missing too. Several other structures came within a few feet of burning.

Brantford, North Dakota

A visitor to our Facebook page said Brantford is now a true ghost town with no remaining residents. There is a house in Brantford (not pictured) that appears to have been the last one that was occupied, with a satellite dish on the roof, but it no longer seems to be lived in. There are, however, families living in the area who still consider themselves Brantford residents. The Ludwig family lives not even a mile down the road.

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Brantford, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Solitude in Brinsmade, North Dakota

Solitude in Brinsmade, North Dakota

Brinsmade, North Dakota was platted in Benson County, just west of Devils Lake, on October 7th, 1889 as the Northern Pacific Railway expanded progessively west, carrying settlers and their families to their eventual homes on the plains. It officially became a city in 1904.

Brinsmade, North Dakota

According to the 2010 Census, Brinsmade is now home to 35 residents in 13 households.

Brinsmade, North Dakota

Brinsmade’s most prominent features today are the abandoned grain elevators.

Brinsmade, North Dakota

Brinsmade, North Dakota

Brinsmade is the central locale in Richard K. Hofstrand’s book, “With Affection, Marten,” a fictionalized account of his ancestor Marten Hofstrand’s immigration journey from Sweden to North Dakota. It is an exceptional glimpse at what it was like to be a settler in the early days of North Dakota.

Brinsmade, North Dakota

For those interested in more history of Brinsmade, there is an out-of-print book by Susan Rolle Foy, “Memories of Brinsmade, North Dakota,” published in 1976. I have not read it, but I’ve been told it’s full of interesting information.

Brinsmade, North Dakota

The remains of an unknown structure.

Brinsmade, North Dakota

According to “North Dakota: Every Town on the Map, and Moreby Vernell and Louise Johnson, Brinsmade was named for Reverend S. Brinsmade, congregational minister of Beloit, Wisconsin. The town site was located on the original homestead of John Erickson.

Brinsmade, North Dakota

The remains of a sidewalk where there are no longer any businesses or homes to visit.



Brinsmade, North Dakota

The school did not appear to have been used for classes in quite some time. Update: Site visitor Kevin Lunde reports the school was built in 1959 and only used for ten years as the last class was excused in 1969.

Brinsmade, North Dakota

You can support our efforts to photograph North Dakota’s lost and vanishing places by ordering our latest hardcover coffee table book, Churches of the High Plains. Makes a stellar gift!

Brinsmade, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

The Ruins of Munster Country School

The Ruins of Munster Country School

This is the second time we’ve visited the Munster country school, in Eddy County, a short drive northwest of New Rockford. We originally set out to photograph this place in October of 2012 under the assumption it was still intact, but 2012 was one of the driest summers on record, and when we arrived, we found the school had recently burned.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

The Flooding of Grahams Island

The Flooding of Grahams Island

Captain Duncan Graham was a Scotsman who came to North Dakota after getting started as a fur trader for Hudson’s Bay Company. Graham believed there was profit to be made in the trading business, and he founded a trading post on the island that now bears his name. Though the date is in dispute, Graham is believed to have inhabited the island around 1810 to 1817; far earlier than the flood of homesteaders to come six decades later.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Spring in Jud, North Dakota

Spring in Jud, North Dakota

This is Jud, North Dakota, in Lamoure County, about 14 miles northwest of Edgeley.

Jud, North Dakota

Jud is far from a ghost town — there were 72 residents according to the 2010 census, but we found out about Jud after someone suggested there was a school that might be a good photo opportunity, and upon further investigation, we were very excited to find this church on the edge of town.

Jud, North Dakota

Doug Wick’s “North Dakota Place Names” says Jud was first named Fox, then Gunthorpe before the name was changed to Jud in 1906 to honor Judson Lamoure, the politician who also lent his name to the county.

Jud, North Dakota

This is St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church.

Jud, North Dakota

Jud, North Dakota

Jud, North Dakota

This church was featured in our book, “Churches of the High Plains,” and prints of this church are available in our Etsy store.

Jud, North Dakota

Jud, North Dakota

Jud, North Dakota

Service Dogs of America has a facility right behind this school.

Jud, North Dakota

Geese migrating north over the former Public School.

Jud, North Dakota

Jud, North Dakota

This museum is open by appointment only.

Jud, North Dakota

Jud, North Dakota

The last gas price on this pump was over $2/gallon. Maybe it hasn’t been out of service for as long as it looks.

Jud, North Dakota

Jud, North Dakota
Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Beaver Township School

Beaver Township School

This is the Beaver Township Country School/Township Hall, on Mud Lake in Benson County, about 23 miles southeast of Rugby, just a short drive south of York, North Dakota.

Beaver Township School

The location of this school, right on the water, is very beautiful, however, we battled 40 mile-per-hour wind gusts all day as we stopped at places like Jospehine and Immanuel Lutheran Church, and when we arrived here, it was positively frigid. Terry and I were both reminded what it must have been like to attend school in a little building like this in a howling snowstorm. Brrr.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Back to Balfour

Back to Balfour

We visited Balfour in November of 2014, nine years after our first visit, to get some photos of all the things we missed the first time. We actually tried to revisit Balfour in 2012, but a road construction crew had traffic at a complete stop on Highway 52, complicating our travel schedule, and we decided to wait until another time, so it was nice to finally get back there.

Balfour, North Dakota

Most notably, Balfour has this abandoned church standing right along Highway 52. If you drive the stretch between Minot and Harvey, you’ll see it.

Balfour, North Dakota

We’re told this church was originally in Verendrye, North Dakota, a near ghost-town where only a farm and the facade of the old school remain standing.

Balfour, North Dakota

On this particular weekend, winter was about two minutes away, and the skies had been flat, gray, overcast the whole time. Balfour was our last stop before heading for home.

balfour14

balfour5

This church, several derelict homes, along with several inhabited ones, stand on the south side of Highway 52.

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

On the north side of the highway, some familiar sights… like the former Post Office and Community Hall, covered in gorgeously rusted tin siding.

Balfour, North Dakota

The sunset was approaching and the street light was on.

balfour7

Right across the street, the former bank.

Balfour, North Dakota

As we were photographing this area, we ran into the Mayor of Balfour who informed us there are now about 20 residents in town. He also told us about the former fire station and jail, and gave us permission to shoot it as long as we promised to be careful.

balfour42

This little non-descript building once functioned as the fire station and jail in Balfour.

Balfour, North Dakota

Inside, the firefighters’ jackets still hang on the wall. The years they’ve been hanging here can be seen demonstrated in jacket number four. The original red wall paint remains on the wood where the jacket has shielded it from the elements that have been pouring in through the open roof for years. Winds have blown the jacket back and forth on the hook, wearing a fan shape on the wood, and the silhouette of jackets that have fallen on the floor can still be seen on the wall.

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

The siren still rests on top of a tower outside.

Balfour, North Dakota

This is in the room on the other side of the wall from where the jackets are hanging.

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

The door on the left leads to the Balfour town jail. Seeing this chair with the ashtray on the floor made me imagine a jailer, sitting here smoking cigarettes, waiting for a county deputy to arrive and take custody of a prisoner.

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

The jail cell is made from two by fours, and when the door is closed, it is pitch black inside.

Balfour, North Dakota

These two abandoned homes stand on the west side of town.

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

The clouds had been around all day, but just as we were finishing up shooting this school, the sun ducked below the cloud cover and illuminated Balfour in a beautiful golden light that would only last about twenty minutes before sundown.

Balfour, North Dakota

There was another school in Balfour before this one.

Balfour, North Dakota

Part of the wall has collapsed on the south side of the school.

Balfour, North Dakota

Trees have sprouted between the slabs that once served as the basketball court.

Balfour, North Dakota

Just north of the school, this building with a collapsed roof hides in the trees. We intended to get a closer shot, but the changing light conditions made us adjust our priorities. Perhaps next time.Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

There’s something hidden in the photo above. Can you spot it? (Click the image, then again on the next page to see it full size.)

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

We have featured Balfour in several of our hardcover coffee table books.

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Balfour, North Dakota

Photographer Ria Cabral sent us some photos of Balfour in winter you can see here.

Balfour, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC



Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Message from Above in Guelph

Message from Above in Guelph

Guelph, North Dakota is in Dickey County, not far from Ellendale. In 1930, the census said Guelph had 158 residents and that’s as many as ever called Guelph home.

Guelph, North Dakota

Guelph, North Dakota

The old Guelph public school is now an antique and vintage-type business.

Guelph, North Dakota

Terry was photographing this school when he noticed a message from above.

Guelph, North Dakota

Guelph, North Dakota

Guelph, North Dakota

This church has been super-nicely renovated and looks like it would make a great place for a wedding.

Guelph, North Dakota

A remnant of Guelph’s legacy as a Great Northern Railroad town.

Guelph, North Dakota

Guelph, North Dakota

Guelph, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC



Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Grand Rapids School

Grand Rapids School

Grand Rapids, North Dakota is a town in Lamoure County that owes its existence to a lie. Captain Homer T. Elliot built the first homestead between Jamestown and Huron, Dakota Territory here in 1879. Not wanting to travel many miles to get his mail every day, Elliot reported to the government that a town called Grand Rapids had sprung up, and appointed himself Postmaster.

Grand Rapids, North Dakota

It was a self-serving lie. A town named Grand Rapids did not yet exist. Nevertheless, a stagecoach line arrived soon after, and then another. If it weren’t for Elliot’s little white lie, Grand Rapids, North Dakota would not exist today.

Grand Rapids, North Dakota

We visited Grand Rapids specifically to photograph this school which, according to a fading plaque on the site, was built in 1916 but hasn’t been used since 1962.

Grand Rapids, North Dakota

Grand Rapids, North Dakota

Grand Rapids, North Dakota

A small one-room school stands in the weeds just down the road.

Photos and Video by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp copyright © 2014 Sonic Tremor Media

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Remote and Abandoned: Albion Township Country School

Remote and Abandoned: Albion Township Country School

This is an abandoned country school in Albion Township, Dickey County, about eight miles northwest of Ellendale.

Albion Township Country School

There was a short stretch of gravel road that was pretty rough on the way to this place, but we got rewarded with the sound of pure prairie once we arrived — We arrived shortly before sunset and we were greeted by crickets and wind through the grass.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

This is Nome, North Dakota, in Barnes County, about 20 miles southeast of Valley City.  I was delivering books earlier this week and stopped to shoot Sheldon, North Dakota since I was in the area, and the highway took me right through Nome as I was on the way home, so I pulled-in and grabbed a few shots.

Nome, North Dakota

According to the 2010 Census, there are 62 residents of Nome, North Dakota.

Nome School

In 2005, Terry and I stopped in Nome to photograph the old school as we were passing through on our way to somewhere else. The photo above is how it appeared in 2005.

Nome School

Today, you can see the trees have grown quite a bit, and the full summer foliage nearly hides the school from view entirely. This “Then and Now” animation shows the difference between a photo postcard view from 1919 and the shot we got in 2005.

Nome School

I was hoping to get inside and take some photos, so I drove around the back, thinking the property owner might be there and I could ask permission to go in, but I just ran into a dead end, so I snapped this shot and left, not wanting to upset anybody.

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

There’s still plenty of life in Nome, but some cool abandoned structures to shoot too.

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

I looked around to see if the Nome Bank building in this postcard was still standing, but I didn’t see it anywhere.  The bank shown below does not appear to be the same building.

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

This farmhouse was just off the side of the highway about three miles south of town.

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

Nome, North Dakota

A peek at the top floor. I didn’t dare go all the way up due to the condition of the floors and the roof. Below, what remains of the kitchen.

Nome, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Morning in Sheldon, North Dakota

Morning in Sheldon, North Dakota

I was on the road to deliver some books this morning and I decided to stop in Sheldon because I’d seen the old bank once before and I wanted to shoot it.  It’s not a ghost town, not even close, the population in 2010 was over 100, but I’m always on the lookout for good photo opportunities in small towns.

Sheldon, North Dakota

Sheldon, North Dakota is in Ransom County, about 33 miles southeast of Valley City.

Sheldon, North Dakota

Sheldon, North Dakota

I was ready to take off after I snapped a few shots but as I was driving away, I noticed a few other notable places and decided to shoot a little more in Sheldon.

Sheldon, North Dakota

This old depot caught my eye right away.  Sheldon was founded in 1881 and the Northern Pacific railroad arrived in 1882.  In your mind’s eye you can almost imagine travelers waiting here for their train.

Sheldon, North Dakota

The depot is locked up tight with shiny new locks, and the present owner is using it for storage.

Sheldon, North Dakota

Sheldon, North Dakota

Sheldon has an interesting story about the failed attempt to drill an artesian well to serve the local roller mill in 1906.  The foreman was too busy in a card game to oversee the final installation of the casing, so he gave an assistant instructions on how to finish the well without him, with catastrophic results.  When the valve was opened, water sprayed 200 feet in the air and all attempts to fix the well failed.  It was eventually abandoned.

Sheldon, North Dakota

You can almost imagine the old railroad agent arriving here before dawn under the light of the lamp over the door to prepare for the days’ travelers.

Sheldon, North Dakota

Former home of the Sheldon Shadows.  The mascot name was spelled out in colored shingles on the roof, but weathering has started to peel the roof resulting in the (perhaps apropos) blurring of the name on the roof.

Sheldon, North Dakota

Sheldon, North Dakota

Sheldon, North Dakota

A local told me they have pretty good food at D’s Dear Stand in Sheldon.

Sheldon, North Dakota

Sheldon, North Dakota

Sheldon, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

We set out from Fargo to photograph some abandoned places shortly after six in the morning on this day, so it was early afternoon by the time we found ourselves all the way out in Sentinel Butte. We were getting hungry and we decided to shoot a few quick things before heading back to Beach, North Dakota for lunch.Sentinel Butte, ND

Sentinel Butte is in Golden Valley County near the Montana border, just a few miles east of Beach, North Dakota, situated in a gorgeous green carpet of prairie grass, broken in places by ragged patches of badland and alkaline earth — a middle ground between inhabitable and inhospitable.  According to the 2010 Census, Sentinel Butte has 56 residents, down from 62 in 2000. They have their own website here.

Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

This school is on the National Register of Historic Places, and it’s also home to a time capsule buried in 1976, scheduled to be opened in 2076.

Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

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Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

Thank you for your service.

Sentinel Butte, North Dakota
Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

The grounds also make a great place to play horseshoes.

Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

Someone is converting this old Post Office to a residence.

This trip took place in July of 2014, and we saw a lot of this on this trip — old buildings appropriated for housing due to the oil industry. We don’t know if that’s the case here, but we did see a lot of it in various places. Schools, churches, and old abandoned homes, now re-inhabited, and frequently with RVs or 18-wheelers parked in the yard. In this housing shortage, people are using all kinds of old structures as dwellings.

Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

Sentinel Butte, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Highland Township Country School

Highland Township Country School

We just happened across this old country school in Highland Township, Hettinger County. It’s just west of the Neuberg Congregational Church, about thirty miles southeast of Dickinson.

Highland Township School

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Judson, North Dakota

Judson, North Dakota

This is Judson, North Dakota, a small town in Morton County, southwest of Mandan. I discovered this church one day while I was messing around with Google Street View, so we made plans to stop for a visit.

Judson, North Dakota

Judson was the first stop on a trip in which we had planned to go all the way to Montana. We set out at the crack of dawn from Fargo and drove three hours and fifteen minutes west on Interstate 94. Access is limited today and the traffic sails by uninterrupted by small-town life. We got off at the Judson exit, glad to stretch our legs.

Judson, North Dakota

The two most prominent structures in Judson are the church and the school, which is for sale. It appears it has been used for a home at some point in the past, and it now wears the stickers of replacement windows. There’s a For Sale sign in the tall grass out front, obscured in the weeds, as if nature itself conspires to foil a sale and consume this place.

To hopefully save you the trouble of sending us an email, we do not know the asking price or have any contact information for the property owner.

Judson, North Dakota



Judson, North Dakota

If you bought this school, this would be your view coming into your driveway.

Judson, North Dakota

Judson, North Dakota

The previous residents had a skateboard ramp.

Judson, North Dakota

Anybody who buys this property will have to tackle some upgrades to this bridge because it’s not in great condition.

Judson, North Dakota

Judson, North Dakota

This church was featured on the cover of Churches of the High Plains.

Judson, ND

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Before the Flood: Leaving Sanish, North Dakota

Before the Flood: Leaving Sanish, North Dakota

We’ve posted several galleries dedicated to Sanish, North Dakota, the former Missouri River town that was dismantled timber and brick and dispersed to higher ground when the Garrison Dam was erected, flooding this part of the Missouri River Valley.  There’s a gallery dedicated to the construction of Four Bears Bridge, our visit to the crumbling remains during historic low water levels in 2005, a Christmas in Sanish gallery, and a look down the street in front of the school and church, but no two photos we’ve seen so far capture this time in our history as these two photos submitted by Don Hammer.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

School’s Out in Kempton, North Dakota

School’s Out in Kempton, North Dakota

We were on a trip to explore some spots in east central North Dakota when we ran across Kempton. It was a place we had taken note of previously, with the intention of visiting some day, and here we were, just passing through.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Ringsaker Lutheran and Romness Bridge

Ringsaker Lutheran and Romness Bridge

Someone suggested this place to us last fall, we waited all winter to visit, and it was worth the wait.  Ringsaker Lutheran Church and School are about seven and half miles north of Cooperstown, and they’re rich in history dating back to what is claimed to be the first Christian religious service in Griggs County, in 1879 or 1880.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Abandoned Barnes County School

Abandoned Barnes County School

This abandoned school was not a planned stop, but we happened to drive right by it and decided we should stop to shoot it. This abandoned country school is in northern Barnes County, about five miles southwest of Sibley, North Dakota. If anyone knows the official name of this school, please leave a comment below.

Update: a visitor has identified this school as Weiland’s St. Mary’s School

Abandoned Barnes County School

Abandoned Barnes County School

Abandoned Barnes County School

Abandoned Barnes County School

Abandoned Barnes County School

Abandoned Barnes County School

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

More Corinth, North Dakota

More Corinth, North Dakota

We visited Corinth in May of 2010 and we were thrilled at the photo opportunities. Corinth is in Williams County, about thirty minutes northeast of Williston. A follower on Facebook reports the 2014 population of Corinth is 4 residents.  Please enjoy these previously unpublished shots.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Walsh County Dereliction

Walsh County Dereliction

Every so often we discover some photos in an old folder and we can’t pinpoint exactly where we snapped them. It’s usually a quick roadside stop where one of us shot some photos while the other grabbed sodas out of the cooler — three minutes and we’re gone. This was likely one of those stops.

Somewhere in Walsh County between Grafton and Conway, we stopped and shot this old building — a country school or township hall perhaps. It caught our attention due to the unnatural angle at which it now resides as it collapses in a slow-motion, three decade implosion.

Walsh County, North Dakota

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Walsh County, North Dakota

Walsh County, North Dakota

Walsh County, North Dakota

Update: This location has been identified as the former Prairie Center Township School, District #6 at the Pisek Corner in Walsh County, shown on the map below. It burned in 2011 (we took these shots in June of that year) and ruins are all that remain today.


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Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

More Abandoned Hamberg

More Abandoned Hamberg

Hamberg lost their school to a grassfire on April Fool’s Day, 2012.  In its absence, we took a new look at our archive of photos from 2008 and found these previously unseen things.  Enjoy.

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

To see the collection of school photos, see the main Hamberg photo gallery from 2008.

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

This old bus next to the school sure would have been a nice fix-up project.

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

Hamberg, North Dakota

We have a special weakness for old Post Offices like this one in Hamberg. They’re steeped in history and frequently have so much character.

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Hamberg, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

 

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Omemee and the Batie Family

Omemee and the Batie Family

These photos were sent in by Cathy Zabel, a collection of things on Omemee, North Dakota, a true ghost town in Bottineau county. Omemee once had a population of 650 residents, and every kind of business one would expect from a prairie town of its size — a hotel, restaurant, grain elevators, opera house, even a newspaper — but today it has almost entirely vanished from the landscape, so we’re especially grateful for Cathy’s submission. It’s a chance to travel back in time and see Omemee as it was, a thriving North Dakota community from the turn-of-the-century. Cathy’s comments are included below.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

More Lunds Valley

More Lunds Valley

Our Lunds Valley archive is spilling over with stuff we’ve never posted before.  These shots were captured in May of 2010 in Lunds Valley, Mountrail County, about 60 miles northwest of Minot.

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

This grain elevator in Lunds Valley is so photogenic, we featured it on the dustjacket of our first book.

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

There are several burned out structures in Lunds Valley.

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

That’s the remains of the school off in the distance in the photo above.

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

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Lunds Valley, North Dakota

The school was destroyed in a fire and all of the non-flammable artifacts still rest in the tall grass… these sinks; the metal frames from students’ desks.

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Lunds Valley, North Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Verendrye in Black & White

Verendrye in Black & White

We’ve long hoped to run across some photos of the town that was once Verendrye, North Dakota. We drove by the crumbling facade of the school a few years ago and snapped a photo, but we hadn’t yet seen any photos of Verendrye when it still looked like a town.  So, we were thrilled when we got an email from Kathy Haynes with some photos and a drawing attached.  She was very informative, and her comments and captions are shown below.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Minot Central High School

Minot Central High School

The space where Minot High School’s Central Campus now stands has a long history as home to several impressive schools, one of which also happens to be my alma mater.  In 1893, a far-too-small schoolhouse was replaced with the building below – Central School, sometimes referred to as “Central Graded School” with the “d”.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Ten More Lost North Dakota Places

Ten More Lost North Dakota Places

Sometimes we photograph a place and find out years later that it’s gone, sometimes the place is gone by the time we get there.  But the one constant is that the list of places is growing all the time.

Here’s another list of ten more significant North Dakota places that have unfortunately lost their battle with time. When you’re done with this one, check out 10 Lost North Dakota Places, and 8 More Lost North Dakota Places.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy

Ten Lost North Dakota Places

Ten Lost North Dakota Places

It’s always a thrill to see enthusiastic residents get involved in saving historically and culturally significant places in their communities, but in North Dakota’s vanishing small towns, the losses frequently outnumber the wins by a significant margin. It’s something we’ve seen time and again in over ten years of photographing North Dakota.

What follows is our personal list, by no means exhaustive, of ten significant North Dakota places that have unfortunately lost their battle with time.

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Troy Larson is an author, photographer, gentleman adventurer (debatable) from Fargo, North Dakota, and co-founder of Ghosts of North Dakota. @NorthDakotaTroy